Arts
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
Art History A - College Prep

Art History A Aligned with the California State Content Standards and Framework for Art and Visual and Performing Arts for California Public Schools, 11th-12th grade level appropriate coursework and expectations are followed in this introduction to various concepts that are related to the study of Art History. Defined as a basic human need for creative expression, people from every culture throughout history have produced art. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and through directed assignments, this Course defines formal elements of works of art in the genres of painting, architecture, and sculpture and describes art’s role in societies. Students will examine, identify, and analyze (compare and contrast) works from various artists, time periods, and religions including pre-history, Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Chinese, Byzantine, Medieval European, Renaissance, and Baroque.

×
Art History B - College Prep

In conjunction with Art History A, this course Aligned with the California State Content Standards and Framework for Art and Visual and Performing Arts for California Public Schools, 11th-12th grade level appropriate coursework and expectations are followed. This course transitions from the traditional elements that evolved during the political and moral chaos of the pre-World War II time period into the more modern and contemporary expressions of societies’ reflective values in the 21st century. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and through directed assignments relating to the study of cultures of Neoclassical French, American Pop, Asian (including Hindu, Buddhist, Japanese), African, and Islamic Modernistic Realism, students will continue to examine, identify, and analyze works from various artists and may better comprehend the more recent societal periods, including Romantic, Enlightenment, Revivalist, Post-Impressionist, Symbolic, and Avant-Garde. Additionally, this course will provide students with an awareness of art-related career fields that they may pursue.

×
Music Appreciation B
×
Health Education
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
Choices For Life

Relationships within the family unit continue to change as children move through adolescence to adulthood. This course will better prepare students to make healthy decisions as they cope with life’s changes and to acquire meaningful skills that will help them improve the quality of life in general. Parental consent to take this course is required.

×
Health Education

This course covers wellness, nutrition and healthy eating, individual growth and development, family living skills, infectious and non-infectious diseases, drug, alcohol, and tobacco use and abuse, consumer and community health, safety first aid, and environmental health. Since the course discusses the misuse of drugs, the human reproductive system, and sexually transmitted diseases, parental consent to take this course is required.

 
×
Language Arts
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
American Literature A - College Prep

American Literature A/B introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres.  Students read selected letters, American literature, poetry, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, drama, speeches, novels, nonfiction, technical and informational texts, as well as material that addresses the research process, rhetoric and oral communication, and the Writing Process.  Students will also read full-length works like Breaking Through, by Francisco Jiménez. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning projects are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
American Literature B - College Prep

American Literature A/B introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres.  Students read selected letters, American literature, poetry, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, drama, speeches, novels, nonfiction, technical and informational texts, as well as material that addresses the research process, rhetoric and oral communication, and the Writing Process.  Students will also read full-length works like Hunger of Memory, by Richard Rodriguez. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning projects are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Dimensions of Culture
This elective course is designed for students with a 5th to 8th grade reading level, and contains information and activities to support literacy development. The contemporary reading material is designed to be high-interest, relevant, and engaging, giving students the opportunity to experience success in an online environment.
×
English 1A - College Prep

In conjunction with English 1B, English 1A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students will gain experience with fiction, nonfiction, short stories, drama, historical literature, technical and informational texts, oral communication the Writing Process, grammar and mechanics, and critical thinking and analysis. Students are asked to read and analyze major literary works such as Dance Hall of the Dead by Tony Hillerman and Sunrise Over Fallujah by John Steinbeck. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions and activities are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
English 1B - College Prep

In conjunction with English 1A, English 1B continues to introduce students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students will gain experience with fiction, nonfiction, short stories, drama, historical literature, technical and informational texts, oral communication the Writing Process, grammar and mechanics, and critical thinking and analysis. Students are asked to read and analyze major literary works such as Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, and West Side Story by Arthur Laurents and Jerome Robbins. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions and activities are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
English 2A - College Prep

In conjunction with English 2B, English 2A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres.  Students read selected short stories, mythology, poetry, historical literature, speeches, folklore/legends, novels, and nonfiction, as well as material that addresses the research process, oral communication, and the Writing Process.  Students will also read full-length texts like Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
English 2B - College Prep

In conjunction with English 2A, English 2B introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres.  Students read selected short stories, mythology, poetry, historical literature, speeches, folklore/legends, novels, and nonfiction, as well as material that addresses the research process, oral communication, and the Writing Process.  Students will also read full-length texts like To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, and Night, by Elie Wiesel. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
English 3A - College Prep

In conjunction with English 3B, English 3A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres.  Students read selected short stories, American literature, poetry, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, drama, speeches, novels, memoir, and nonfiction, as well as material that addresses the research process, oral communication, and the Writing Process.  Students will also read full-length texts like The Crucible by Arthur Miller and Parrot in the Oven: mi vida by Victor Martinez. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
English 3B - College Prep

In conjunction with English 3A, English 3B introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres.  Students read selected short stories, American literature, poetry, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, drama, speeches, novels, memoir, and nonfiction, as well as material that addresses the research process, oral communication, and the Writing Process.  Students will also read full-length texts like Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented.  Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
English 4A - College Prep

English 4A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres. Students read selected letters, American literature, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, nonfiction and informational texts, as well as material that addresses the research process, rhetoric and oral communication, and the Writing Process. Students will also read full-length works like Bless Me, Ultima. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills.

×
English 4B - College Prep

In conjunction with English 4A, this course continues to present students various concepts related to the study of language and offers strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres. Students read historical documents from various cultures, American literature, poetry, drama, speeches, nonfiction and informational texts, as well as material that addresses the research process, rhetoric and oral communication, and the Writing Process. Students will also read full-length works like Hamlet, The Light in the Forest, and A Bintel Brief. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills.

×
Grammar Through Literature A

This course helps students learn how to build skills in writing. Punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules are presented through applications to demonstrate effective writing that can be easily understood. A variety of literature is used to introduce and practice the grammar topics—fiction and nonfiction. Literature is used to assist in the understanding and application of grammar principles. All units are accompanied by a CD that provides assistance with the correct pronunciation of the words contained within each literature selection. All levels of the English Language Development Standards (ELD) for California Public Schools are addressed in the content of this course. Substrands of the English Language Arts Content Standards are also addressed in each of the five units. The various skills at each level are introduced through the content of literature selections and then applied through various activities.

×
Grammar Through Literature B

In this course grammar rules from Grammar Through Literature A are reviewed. The course uses a variety of literature to review grammar topics and increase comprehension for practical application of the principles. Major concepts of the course include writing complete sentences and paragraphs, punctuation, spelling, capitalization, correct use of modifiers, preparing and delivering a speech, writing a résumé, and completing a job application. Students will complete a research project, compose persuasive, analytical, and reflective essays and responses to literature, and write business letters and thank-you notes. All units are accompanied by a CD that provides assistance with the correct pronunciation of the words contained within each literature selection. All levels of the English Language Development Standards (ELD) for California Public Schools are addressed in the content of this course. Substrands of the English Language Arts Content Standards are also addressed in each of the five units. The various skills at each level are introduced through the content of literature selections and then applied through various activities.

×
Reading and Writing Skills

This course helps students develop the language arts skills and strategies necessary to be successful on tests such as California Standards Test (CST) and the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). This course is aligned with the English/Language Arts Standards, and divided into five units: Unit 1: Reading Standard 1.0—Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary Development; Written and Oral English Language Conventions 1.0; Unit 2: Reading Comprehension 2.0—Focus on Informational Materials Unit 3: Literary Response and Analysis 3.0; Unit 4: Writing 1.0—Writing Strategies; and Unit 5: Writing Applications: 2.0 Genres and Their Characteristics.

×
Writing Composition A

This course is designed to introduce students to various concepts related to the study of critical reading, writing, and analysis. Students focus on the rhetorical, grammatical, and syntactical patterns of language and the Writing Process, with emphasis placed on how to write with intent and command over purpose, audience, ethos, and message. Each Unit includes concepts that build upon one another; early Units focus on grammar and mechanics, sentence and paragraph construction, etc., and later Units focus on the rhetorical framework (purpose, audience, ethos, message) and how to utilize it when critically analyzing texts or writing their own. Throughout the course, students practice a variety of different types of structured essay writing and by the end of the course, students demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, critical analysis, rhetorical structure, and research skills.

×
Life Skills
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
Career Exploration

This course provides students with opportunities to explore career pathways and prepare for successful jobs in a global economy.

×
Economic Decision Making

This course is designed around the California State Standards for Economics and Career and Technical Education.  Upon completion, students will be familiar with consumerism, their role as consumers in today’s economy, and fundamental principles of economics related to personal and household finances including budgeting, credit, shopping, and banking.

×
Learning in the Information Age A

This course is designed to give students tools to help them learn information faster, understand information better and retain information longer. The tools in this course can be used in any subject in high school and beyond. Each unit of this course uses a variety of study skills and techniques to help prepare students for reading textbooks, studying for quizzes and tests, and improving reading and memory skills.

×
Learning in the Information Age B

In this course the focus moves from academic to real-world situations. Students are given basic information about various topics including banking and postal services, government resources such as social security and taxes, the U.S. political system and voting, technology like the Internet and email, and the employment process. The information is presented in a variety of ways with ample opportunity for practicing applications and essay writing.

×
You And The News

California Standards from different subject areas are applied in practical and “real world” situations in this course. In addition, many of the tools and basic skills in this course—such as reading, writing, critical thinking, and analyzing data—will help students outside of school by teaching them how to read directions and documents, compose legible and well-written documents, and critically analyze the world around them.

×
Mathematics
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
Algebra A - College Prep

In conjunction with Algebra B, this course shows how algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations and, in seeing the larger picture and in understanding the underlying concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to new situations and problems.  Students review Pre-Algebra skills (including variables, expressions, order of operations, and equations) and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. As students progress through the course, they will study concepts like sequences and their graphs, independent and dependent relationships, how to simplify and solve equations and functions, monomials and polynomials, factorization, exponential graphs and functions, transformations, slope, how to solve systems, square roots, quadratic equations, inequalities, absolute value, statistics, etc. Much of the course covers abstract relationships and their manipulations, but it also involves algebraic thinking and the application of these skills to word problems and real life situations. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.  Students have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences.  The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independence which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Algebra B - College Prep

In conjunction with Algebra A, this course shows how algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations and, in seeing the larger picture and in understanding the underlying concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to new situations and problems.  Students review Pre-Algebra skills (including variables, expressions, order of operations, and equations) and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. As students progress through the course, they will study concepts like sequences and their graphs, independent and dependent relationships, how to simplify and solve equations and functions, monomials and polynomials, factorization, exponential graphs and functions, transformations, slope, how to solve systems, square roots, quadratic equations, inequalities, absolute value, statistics, etc. Much of the course covers abstract relationships and their manipulations, but it also involves algebraic thinking and the application of these skills to word problems and real life situations. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.  Students have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences.  The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independence which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Algebra 2A - College Prep

In Algebra 2A and 2B, students build on mathematical concepts learned in Algebra and Geometry by extending their knowledge through the study of functions (polynomial, rational, radical, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic), systems of equations and inequalities, modeling (linear, quadratic, and exponential), trigonometric functions, and probability and statistics. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students work with the concepts in various applications including practice exercises, solving word problems, and working with real-world situations, and they have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Activities and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Algebra 2B - College Prep

In Algebra 2A and 2B, students build on mathematical concepts learned in Algebra and Geometry by extending their knowledge through the study of functions (polynomial, rational, radical, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic), systems of equations and inequalities, modeling (linear, quadratic, and exponential), trigonometric functions, and probability and statistics. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students work with the concepts in various applications including practice exercises, solving word problems, and working with real-world situations, and they have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Activities and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Application Math A

Application Math A is a California State and Common Core standards-based course that helps students develop mathematical computational and procedural skills. Concepts covered in the course include: operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; using proportion, ratio, and percent; measurements in both U.S. and metric systems; and using mathematical reasoning to solve various types of word problems and applications.

×
Application Math B

Application Math B is a standards-based course that continues to build on concepts presented in Application Math A. This course helps students develop mathematical computational and procedural skills. Concepts covered in the course include: statistics and probability, algebraic equations, geometry fundamentals, and using mathematical reasoning to solve various types of problems.

×
Basic Math A

Essential math skills, including the numeration system, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and their application in daily life situations are covered.

×
Basic Math B

Basic Math B is designed to teach students basic mathematical concepts including fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, ratio, proportion, percent, and measurement. Concepts presented address foundational skills for future mathematical studies. This course helps students develop a concrete understanding of the mathematical concepts necessary to prepare for the math portion of the CAHSEE.

×
Consumer Education

The course is designed to address and build upon basic mathematical concepts that are applicable to real-world consumer situations such as banking, finance, investments, housing, insurance, budgeting, employment, compensation, taxes, and starting and operating a small business. Upon completion, students will be familiar with consumerism, their role as consumers in today’s economy, and fundamental principles of economics related to personal and household finances.

×
Geometry A - College Prep

In Geometry A and B, geometric skills are applied to a wide variety of problem-solving situations and, in seeing the larger picture and in understanding the underlying concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to new situations and problems. Students begin by studying the basic essentials of geometry including points, lines, planes, angles, segments, geometric figures, patterns, logic, and reasoning. As students progress through the course, they will study concepts like parallel and perpendicular properties, coordinate geometry, translations and constructions, triangles, congruency and similarity, reflections and symmetry, ratios and proportions, trigonometry, sine and cosine, polygons, proofs, circles, perimeter, area, volume, etc. Students also cover a variety of statistical concepts and applications. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Geometry B - College Prep

In Geometry A and B, geometric skills are applied to a wide variety of problem-solving situations and, in seeing the larger picture and in understanding the underlying concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to new situations and problems. Students begin by studying the basic essentials of geometry including points, lines, planes, angles, segments, geometric figures, patterns, logic, and reasoning. As students progress through the course, they will study concepts like parallel and perpendicular properties, coordinate geometry, translations and constructions, triangles, congruency and similarity, reflections and symmetry, ratios and proportions, trigonometry, sine and cosine, polygons, proofs, circles, perimeter, area, volume, etc. Students also cover a variety of statistical concepts and applications. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Integrated Math 1A - College Prep

Integrated Math 1A is the first semester of Integrated Math 1 and is designed to assist high school students with the development of skills related to the structure and logic of mathematics. In seeing the larger picture and by understanding underlying mathematical concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to solve problems in real-world situations. Both semesters of Integrated Math 1 introduce concepts related to: function families, graphing linear and nonlinear functions, and exponential functions; simplifying, evaluating, and solving equations and systems; algebraic properties; and geometric concepts like angle measures, triangles, circles, constructions, congruency, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, etc.; and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. Students will engage in the content through reading of material, a plethora of examples and opportunities for practice, and utilize technology and online resources successfully and strategically and demonstrate their understanding through problem solving practice, project-based/performance task analysis, writing assignments, interactive activities, and a variety of self and summative assessments. They also utilize technology and online resources successfully and strategically so they can produce written and digital texts that demonstrate their understanding of the concepts presented in the course. Over the course of the year, students will:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

×
Integrated Math 1B - College Prep

Integrated Math 1B is the second semester of Integrated Math 1 and is designed to assist high school students with the development of skills related to the structure and logic of mathematics. In seeing the larger picture and by understanding underlying mathematical concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to solve problems in real-world situations. Both semesters of Integrated Math 1 introduce concepts related to: function families, graphing linear and nonlinear functions, and exponential functions; simplifying, evaluating, and solving equations and systems; algebraic properties; and geometric concepts like angle measures, triangles, circles, constructions, congruency, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, etc.; and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. Students will engage in the content through reading material, a plethora of examples and opportunities for practice, and the utilization of technology and online resources successfully and strategically. Students demonstrate their understanding through problem solving practice, project-based/performance task analysis, writing assignments, interactive activities, and a variety of self and summative assessments. Over the course of the year, students will:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

×
Integrated Math 2A - College Prep

Integrated Math 2A is the first semester of Integrated Math 2 and is designed to assist high school students with the development of skills related to the structure and logic of mathematics. In seeing the larger picture and by understanding underlying mathematical concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to solve problems in real-world situations. In both semesters of Integrated Math 2, students will gain experience with geometric and algebraic solutions to problems in various content areas including: properties of polygons, trigonometry, circles, area and perimeter, proofs, dilations, similarity, ratios, surface area and volume, polynomials, quadratic functions, and radicals, as well as statistical concepts related to probability, data distribution, linear regression, and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. Students will engage in the content through reading material, a plethora of examples and opportunities for practice, and the utilization of technology and online resources successfully and strategically. Students demonstrate their understanding through problem solving practice, project-based/performance task analysis, writing assignments, interactive activities, and a variety of self and summative assessments. Over the course of the year, students will:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.

×
Integrated Math 2B - College Prep

Integrated Math 2B is the second semester of Integrated Math 2 and is designed to assist high school students with the development of skills related to the structure and logic of mathematics. In seeing the larger picture and by understanding underlying mathematical concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to solve problems in real-world situations. In both semesters of Integrated Math 2, students will gain experience with geometric and algebraic solutions to problems in various content areas including: properties of polygons, trigonometry, circles, area and perimeter, proofs, dilations, similarity, ratios, surface area and volume, polynomials, quadratic functions, and radicals, as well as statistical concepts related to probability, data distribution, linear regression, and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. Students will engage in the content through reading material, a plethora of examples and opportunities for practice, and the utilization of technology and online resources successfully and strategically. Students demonstrate their understanding through problem solving practice, project-based/performance task analysis, writing assignments, interactive activities, and a variety of self and summative assessments. Over the course of the year, students will:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.

×
Integrated Math 3A - College Prep

In the first semester of Integrated Math 3, students build on mathematical concepts learned in Integrated Math 1 and 2 by extending their knowledge through the study of functions and graphs, systems of equations and inequalities, polynomial functions, rational expressions and equations, radical functions, and imaginary and complex numbers. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students work with the concepts in various ways including practice exercises, word problems, and performance tasks, and they have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, to think critically, to develop logical thought processes, to use technology and online resources strategically, and to make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Over the course of the year, students will:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.

×
Integrated Math 3B - College Prep

In conjunction with the first semester of Integrated Math 3, students continue to build on mathematical concepts in this semester by extending their knowledge through the study of quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; conic sections; geometric sequences and series; descriptive and analytical modeling; trigonometric ratios, identities, laws, and functions; and probability and statistics. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students work with the concepts in various ways including practice exercises, word problems, and performance tasks, and they have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, to think critically, to develop logical thought processes, to use technology and online resources strategically, and to make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Over the course of the year, students will:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.

×
Math Skills Review

This course is aligned with the California State Mathematics Standards and Frameworks and the five strands adopted by the State Board of Education: Statistics and Data Analysis, Number Sense, Algebra and Functions, Mathematical Reasoning and Measurement, and Geometry. Proficiency in the California Mathematics Standards covered in the course will help students acquire rudimentary math skills and sharpen critical thinking skills. It will prepare students to be successful on the Mathematics portion of the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) and it can also be used as an intervention methodology for students who do not pass the math portion of the CAHSEE.

×
Pre-Algebra

This course serves as a precursor to Algebra A. Calculator activities are provided to stimulate student interest and to facilitate the introduction of math concepts including whole numbers, properties and rules of operations, number theory, rational numbers, ratio, proportion, percentage, measurement, statistics and probability, real numbers, and graphing.  Students will also study basic algebra principles such as algebraic expressions, polynomials, equations, and factoring.

×
Science
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
Biology A (not a-g approved)

Biology A presents students with a wide variety of information, activities, and experiences related to major areas of study in the field of Biology. The topics, which correlate directly with the California State Content Standards, include the study of ecology and ecosystems; cell biology and the fundamental life processes of plants and animals; human physiology including structures, the immune system, and organ systems; and genetics, including mutation, reproduction, DNA, genetic changes, and forensics. In addition, students conduct research, investigations, and experiments and utilize lab activities presented on CD.

×
Biology B (not a-g approved)

Biology B presents students with a wide variety of information, activities, and experiences related to major areas of study in the field of Biology. The topics, which correlate directly with the California State Content Standards, include the study of ecology and ecosystems; human physiology including structures, the central and peripheral nervous systems, and sensory structures and functions; asexual and sexual reproduction in plants and animals; genetic diversity, biotechnology, cloning; Earth Science (fossils, atmosphere, extinction and survival, etc.) and global climate change and ecology. In addition, students conduct research, investigations, and experiments and utilize lab activities presented on CD.

×
Environmental Science A

This course teaches the student how organisms interact with the environment, and with each other, and how they adapt to fit into their environmental niche.

×
Environmental Science B

This course teaches students about the human effect on the environment, the consequences of population growth, and the effect of toxic wastes.  Survival skills are also included.

×
Integrated Science 1A

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts, principles and methods of science by using an integrated approach. It provides information and practice in the following areas of Integrated Science: cells, the basic building blocks of life, systems that produce a functioning organism, Newton’s Laws of Motion, weather, climate, the Earth’s atmosphere and biomes. This Integrated Science course exposes students to concepts in chemistry, physics, Earth science and biology.

×
Integrated Science 1B

Some of the major topics presented in this course include cell function and cell reproduction, the movement of the Earth’s crust, earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, geologic time, the structure of atoms, the periodic table of elements and the bonding of atoms to form molecules, electricity, magnetism and the electromagnetic spectrum. Students also study the natural history of California and are exposed to concepts relating to chemistry, physics, Earth science, and biology.

×
Laboratory Biology A

Laboratory Biology A and B is correlated directly with both the Next Generation Science Standards and the California State Content Standards. This course requires students to work in an online setting for 80% of the course and, in order to support concepts covered there, to also perform hands-on experiments supervised by an instructor in a physical laboratory setting at the school site for the remaining 20%. Guidelines for all lab activities are contained within Cyber High and they count as 20% of the student’s final course grade. This course introduces students to concepts related to cells and cancer; cellular energy including respiration and photosynthesis; the pivotal role of ATP in energy transfer; Mendelian genetics; molecular genetics, including DNA analysis, DNA fingerprinting, and recombinant DNA; biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and enzymes and the factors that affect their activity; the immune system, infectious diseases, and pathogens; the human nervous system, endocrine systems; reproduction in plants and animals; the domains and kingdoms of life and the Linnaean classification system; the evolution of life; and ecology. Students will demonstrate their understanding through lab experiments, writing assignments, interactive activities, projects, and a variety of self-graded and summative assessments.

×
Laboratory Biology B

Laboratory Biology A and B is correlated directly with both the Next Generation Science Standards and the California State Content Standards. This course requires students to work in an online setting for 80% of the course and, in order to support concepts covered there, to also perform hands-on experiments supervised by an instructor in a physical laboratory setting at the school site for the remaining 20%. Guidelines for all lab activities are contained within Cyber High and they count as 20% of the student’s final course grade. This course introduces students to concepts related to cells and cancer; cellular energy including respiration and photosynthesis; the pivotal role of ATP in energy transfer; Mendelian genetics; molecular genetics, including DNA analysis, DNA fingerprinting, and recombinant DNA; biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and enzymes and the factors that affect their activity; the immune system, infectious diseases, and pathogens; the human nervous system, endocrine systems; reproduction in plants and animals; the domains and kingdoms of life and the Linnaean classification system; the evolution of life; and ecology. Students will demonstrate their understanding through lab experiments, writing assignments, interactive activities, projects, and a variety of self-graded and summative assessments.

×
Physical Science A

Students study fundamental concepts related to light, energy, electricity, sound, and pressure, and demonstrate their understanding through various activities that encourage critical thinking and analysis, journal entries, and writing assignments. All units include small experiments and longer investigations requiring formal lab reports.

×
Physical Science B

Physical Science B continues to build on the physical science concepts presented in Physical Science A. Students study fundamental concepts related to matter, elements, mixtures, chemical reactions, motion, and technology, and demonstrate their understanding through activities that encourage critical thinking and analysis, journal entries, and writing assignments. All Units include small experiments and longer investigations requiring formal lab reports.

×
Social Science
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
American Government - College Prep

This course introduces students to the study of American government and democracy. Students will analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, examine the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government, and analyze the relationships among federal, state, and local governments.   Students will trace the emergence of the United States as a world power and examine the major social problems and tensions: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; and the relationship of religion and government.

×
Early California History

Early California History focuses on California from the Native American period through 1850. Because California’s history is rich and varied, old drawings, maps, posters, songs, and photographs are included throughout the course. Literature of the time, including diaries, journals, legends, myths, novels, poetry, and nonfiction accounts help to synthesize the concepts. Early California History covers the following general historical periods in California history: The Native American period; European exploration from the early 1500s-1769; Spanish colonization, 1769-1821; The Mexican period, 1821-1848; The Gold Rush (beginning in 1848); and finally, statehood in 1850.

×
Economics - College Prep

This course provides students with an understanding of fundamental economic concepts and principles. Students will be able to recognize, analyze, and understand economic terms and concepts as well as interpret data and draw conclusions about possible solutions. Major topics within the course include production, supply and demand, economic systems, market types and market equilibrium, economic and business cycles, business structures and organization, monetary and fiscal policy, income and taxes, price index, personal economics, the role of government in the economy, and international trade.  Students are required not only to master the essential components of Economics, but also to understand and articulate (in writing, verbally, and visually) about economics in general, the dynamics that drive the marketplace, the outside forces that can stimulate or depress the economy, and the global economic system in which they live. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
Ethnic Studies

Ethnic Studies is a course designed to give students tools to achieve an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the various cultures of the United States of America. Knowledge about other people and their cultures can lead to a lifelong appreciation for history, art, and literature from around the world. Sensitivity to others’ cultural backgrounds can also aid an individual in a variety of situations, from school to the workplace.

×
Sociology - College Prep

This course provides students with an introduction to Sociology as a scientific approach to understanding culture and society. Students will explore the tools, research and methods used to observe and understand human behavior and various perspectives. Students will discover how sociologists conduct research, their major findings on substantive topics, and will be able to define and apply fundamental concepts in sociology such as norms, sanctions, culture, society, status, role, class, gender, ethnic group, stereotype, discrimination, prejudice, and inequality.

×
U.S. History A - College Prep

U.S. History A and B is a comprehensive study of the United States, beginning with the first semester that covers the vanishing frontier and the movement westward during the late 1800s to the rise of industry in the twentieth century, World War I, the turbulent twenties, and the Great Depression. In the second semester of the course, students study World War II, postwar America, equality and justice, and searching for new values in changing times and in a changing world. Students trace the change in the cultural demographics of American society, the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. The textbook America’s History, Land of Liberty, Book Two: Since 1865 is required reading for this course. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
U.S. History B - College Prep

U.S. History A and B is a comprehensive study of the United States, beginning with the first semester that covers the vanishing frontier and the movement westward during the late 1800s to the rise of industry in the twentieth century, World War I, the turbulent twenties, and the Great Depression. In the second semester of the course, students study World War II, postwar America, equality and justice, and searching for new values in changing times and in a changing world. Students trace the change in the cultural demographics of American society, the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. The textbook America’s History, Land of Liberty, Book Two: Since 1865 is required reading for this course. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
World Geography and Cultures A

World Geography and Cultures A begins with the fundamentals of geography and the five themes of geography. Students are introduced to the physical geological features of the Earth and the solar system. Weather, climate, and ecosystems are also introduced, as well as more specific concepts related to social culture and various political, environmental, and economic systems. Students then explore the geography, culture, and history of various specific geographical areas including the Middle East, Africa, and Europe.

×
World Geography And Cultures B

World Geography and Cultures B is a continuation of World Geography and Cultures A. This course continues on the trajectory covering the geography, culture, and history of South and Southeast Asia, East Asia, the Americas, and Eastern Europe. It also explores globalization and the impact of terrorism, population and poverty, environmental issues, and technology across the world.

×
World History A - College Prep

World History A and B begins with the study of the foundations of civilization and Western democracy, including concepts related to Judaism, Christianity, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the English Civil War, the American Revolution, the French, Latin American, and Russian Revolutions, the reign of different key monarchs, Napoleon Bonaparte, and various nationalist movements that spread throughout Europe and the resulting changes that took place. The course continues with an exploration of imperialism and provides detailed accounts of World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. It also explores the effects of these major events on various countries in the world, the spread of democracy vs. Communism, nuclear arms, the U.N., the struggle for peace, and the challenges faced by the modern world. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
World History B - College Prep

World History A and B begins with the study of the foundations of civilization and Western democracy, including concepts related to Judaism, Christianity, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the English Civil War, the American Revolution, the French, Latin American, and Russian Revolutions, the reign of different key monarchs, Napoleon Bonaparte, and various nationalist movements that spread throughout Europe and the resulting changes that took place. The course continues with an exploration of imperialism and provides detailed accounts of World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. It also explores the effects of these major events on various countries in the world, the spread of democracy vs. Communism, nuclear arms, the U.N., the struggle for peace, and the challenges faced by the modern world. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

×
World Languages
Course Name
College Prep
a-g Approved
Cyber High
English
Spanish
American Sign Language A - College Prep

Learning a language other than English can open doors to business and personal interactions that might otherwise remain closed. As an exciting and vibrant means of communication with unique culture and heritage, ASL is recognized as its own language with its own syntax and presentation that may be taken beyond the classroom and applied to many areas of a student’s life, including the work world and personal activities. Designed to present American Sign Language (ASL) essential tools for clear communication and to encourage students to foster relationships with people who use ASL as their first language, this course is not meant to be an interpretation of word-for-word English (called Signed Exact English) but rather a language that is expressed through the hands, face, and body and that is then perceived through the eyes. A visual and gestural language, ASL carries as much information as an oral and aural language, just in a different manner. Each Unit explores a different aspect of American Sign Language, including fingerspelling, basic signs, syntax, and other related elements. The information presented in each Unit is meant to not only increase the language, reading, and content area skills of students but also to encourage students to develop and use their signing skills for communication within their own communities.

×
American Sign Language B - College Prep

Learning a language other than English can open doors to business and personal interactions that might otherwise remain closed. As an exciting and vibrant means of communication with unique culture and heritage, ASL is recognized as its own language with its own syntax and presentation that may be taken beyond the classroom and applied to many areas of a student’s life, including the work world and personal activities. Designed to present essential tools for clear communication and to encourage students to foster relationships with people who use ASL as their first language, this course is not meant to be an interpretation of word-for-word English (called Signed Exact English) but rather a language that is expressed through the hands, face, and body and that is then perceived through the eyes. A visual and gestural language, ASL carries as much information as an oral and aural aspect of American Sign Language, including fingerspelling, basic signs, syntax, and other related elements. The information presented in each Unit is meant to not only increase the language, reading, and content area skills of students but also to encourage students to develop and use their signing skills for communication within their own communities.

×